When a Negative becomes a Positive for Gina Jannereth

All State 13.1 Series – Half Marathon

Although the triathlon season has come to a wind down, many runners are ramping up for half and full marathons whether the races are local or in other cities and states.  Starting in October through mid February, it’s not hard to find a half or full marathon to run.  In this area alone, runners just finished up the 13.1 Series Half Marathon, the DRC Half Marathon, the Tyler Half and the new local half marathon in Fairview; the Showdown.

Now the well-known Dallas Half and Full Marathon(formerly White Rock)  is right around the corner and many local runners will be lined up at the start line on Sunday, December 9th.  So lets talk about the first time runner taking on their first race.  Most new runners either train with a running buddy or have joined a local program that enables them to train in a group setting.  Although they have done the mileage and have felt the burn, the fatigue and sometimes even a little mental burn out, come race day the adrenaline is in full force.  The excitement at the start line, the chatter among the runners, and the personal butterflies that have landed right in the middle of their stomach is a new experience.  Some runners handle it well while others find it a challenge.

Although the new runner is use to their normal training run they have done over and over again (meaning starting slowly and working into the pace of the day) something happens on a race day.  On race day the tendency for many new runners is to do the opposite and rather than starting out nice and easy they go out too fast.  The adrenaline takes over and urges the new runner to join the crowd that bolts from the starting line; always too fast.  And they know, they need to slow down but….they feel good, their legs are fresh, logic slips away….
Starting faster than what you are able to finish in is the least effective way to race and can be so mentally depleting. Starting out running, then watching your pace start to slow down, then having to walk, etc…..We have all been there.

So this article is to show an example of a new runner from CK SPORTS that had a plan, executed it and ignore all outside distractions.  She saw runners pass by her but she held her pace.  Her plan was to run her first half starting out at a 12 minute pace and increase her pace throughout the second half and that she did.  See results below.  The Mile 5 dip in the pace was also something she learned in her first race. ….wearing too much clothing had her shedding off clothes for the second half.  Next time, she will dress differently knowing her body temperature will warm up quickly.

Not many new runners complete their first distance race AND can show off a negative split race….Lets congratulate, Gina Jannereth!  One under her belt and her words, “It was a great race!  I was so excited that I followed my head and stayed disciplined.  I felt good during the race and after the race.”

Mile 1 11:53
Mile 2 12:15
Mile 3 11:49
Mile 4 12:02
Mile 5 13:10**
Mile 6 11:54
Mile 7 11:48
Mile 8 11:35
Mile 9 11:20
Mile 10 10:35
Mile 11 10:24
Mile 12 10:10
Mile 13 10:19

Endorphins Make Me Feel Good…

So what is an endorphin?  How do you explain or describe it?  

Well, Wikipedia’s definition is:

I will have a bowl of endorphins please

Endorphins (“endogenous morphine”) are endogenous opioid peptides that function as neurotransmitters.[1] They are produced by the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus in vertebrates during exercise,[2] excitement, pain, consumption of spicy food, love and orgasm,[3][4] and they resemble the opiates in their abilities to produce analgesia and a feeling of well-being

ummmm…..what???  They are endogenous opioid peptides?   Okay then.  Lets start with an easy statement about endorphins.  They are supposed to make a person feel good – that simple.   Some people say it’s in our heads while others have done research and say it is a chemical released in our body that makes us happy, content, settled.  The articles side all over the place – they are not real, they are very real, research has proven, research has not “scientifically” proven…..so read on and you make your own decision.

For runner’s and/or endurance athletes they often are heard describing it as a “runner’s high”.  You know, that good feeling you get after a long run, a roll in the hay or a good laugh?  It’s not just because you’ve relieved exercise guilt, had a wham-bam orgasm or heard an absolute knee-slapper.  That elated feeling, which can last up to 12 hours for some people,also  has a scientific explanation.  It comes from a release of endorphins.   And it’s an “all natural” way of getting high.  Endorphins trigger a positive feeling in the body, similar to that of morphine.     This  feeling,  is often accompanied by a positive and energizing outlook on life.   

Endorphins act as analgesics, which means they diminish the perception of pain. They also act as sedatives. They are manufactured in your brain, spinal cord, and many other parts of your body and are released in response to brain chemicals called neurotransmitters referenced in the Wikipedia definition outlined in this article earlier.  The neuron receptors endorphins bind to are the same ones that bind some pain medicines.  However, unlike with morphine, the activation of these receptors by the body’s endorphins does not lead to addiction or dependence.

Dr. Joel Fuhrman, MD, family practitioner and author of  “Eat for Health” and “Eat to Live” notes that the science of endorphins-from-exercise is controversial, and that some medical professionals believe the positive feeling you get when you meet a physical challenge, rather than the exertion itself, is what stimulates the endorphin release. Several articles that were researched indicated that endorphins are indeed real and provide benefits to us that include:

Relief of pain
Enhanced immune system
Reduced stress levels
Postpone aging process
Modulated appetite
Lowers blood pressure
Influences calm or euphoric state of mind

 But whatever the cause and benefit, exercise has been proven to enhance the mood.  So lets not speculate any longer.  Get outside, find your sport and start feeling good……endorphin or no endorphin.  In Dr. Fuhrman also recommends prolonged activities such as cross-country skiing, swimming, tennis or a long cardio workout for the best effects. So try to catch an endorphin  see what cha think!  

References;

Endorphins 101: Your Guide to Natural Euphoria
Dr Joel Fuhrman; MD Family practitioner and author

How Do I Use a Foam Roller?

Tips for Using a Foam Roller

  • Always check with your doctor before using a foam roller for myofascial release

  • Perform foam roller sessions when your muscles are warm or after a workout.

  • Position the roller under the soft tissue area you want to release or loosen.

  • Gently roll your body weight back and forth across the roller while targeting the affected muscle.

  • Move slowly and work from the center of the body out toward your extremities.

  • If you find a particularly painful area (trigger point), hold that position until the area softens.

  • Focus on areas that are tight or have reduced range of motion.

  • Roll over each area a few times until you feel it relax. Expect some discomfort. It may feel very tender or bruised at first.

  • Stay on soft tissue and avoid rolling directly over bone or joints.

  • Keep your first few foam roller sessions short. About 15 minutes is all you need.

  • Rest a day between sessions when you start.

  • Drink plenty of water after a session, just as you would after a sports massage.

  • After a few weeks you can increase your session time and frequency if you choose.

  • Do not use a foam roller without your physician’s approval if you have any heart illness or chronic pain condition.

More About Techniques With the Foam Roller

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  • Find a tender spot on the area you are working and keep the roller on this spot. Wait for discomfort to diminish by 50-75%. This could take some time and be uncomfortable.

  • When this area is no longer sensitive then begin to see if there are other sensitive areas and repeat.

  • When this area is free of pain and can be rolled over, then continue rolling regularly to keep the area relaxed.

  • Use the roller as warm up prior to activity and also for warm down after exercise

  • There is some freedom for experimentation and “feel” when using the rollers. See what works best for you and manipulate the roller to the correct position.

Maintaining Your Foam Roller

Due to how foam rollers are manufactured, all foam products will have some surface imperfections. Imperfections such as surface bubbles, dimensional tolerance and differences in color are normal. These imperfections will not affect the performance of the foam roller and other foam products.

Normal use will cause indentations or pressure points. Pressure points may slowly re-cover, however, continuous pressure lasting several hours should be avoided. Do not store objects on top of foam items. Foam performs best if stored flat, away from sunlight and within temperature ranges between 75°F – 125°F.

 Cleaning:    

Use a mild soap and water mixture or Isopropyl Rubbing alcohol.  DO NOT use bleach solutions, oils or other chemicals as they can cause softening, discoloration and distortion of shape.

CK SPORTS carries all types of foam rollers; full, half size and even the new GRID.  Stop in and let us set you up with the best foam roller for your sport. 

Tips For Running the Boston Marathon on Monday – 2012

by Dick Beardsley

Congratulations to all of you who are running Boston! It is a race like no other in the world!   From the time you step off the plane you will feel the electricity in the air, that’s all everyone is talking about! As you know, Boston starts in the small town of Hopkinton and winds through different towns along the way into downtown Boston. The first half mile is a pretty good downhill that you will want to be careful on! Between the early downhill, all the runners, along with all the spectators it’s easy to go out too  fast and you will pay a big price for that later in the race. If you think you’re going slow enough at the start, your probably are  going too fast!

The course has some rolling hills during the first half of the race. The first BIG attraction is when you’re coming into the town of Wellsley.  It is the home of Wellsley Girls College and they will be out there in droves screaming their heads off for you. It’s unbelievable!

The course flattens out for a couple of miles after that until you come down a very long steep downhill into the town of Newton Lower Falls but remember what goes down must come up! I think one of the toughest parts of the course is the very long gradual up hill coming up out of that town. No one talks about that one much but in my opinion that is where the hills really begin! At the fire station at mile 17 you turn right onto Commonwealth Ave and this is where the infamous set of hills begins ending with Heartbreak Hill!  The toughest part of that series of hills is coming down the backside of Heartbreak, it can be brutal on your legs! 

Once you’re down that hill you will make a left hand turn and start heading for downtown. When you see the big Citgo billboard you will then know you have about a mile to go to the finish!  You will continue on Commonwealth Ave. and then make a right turn onto Hereford Street. This street is about 3-4 blocks long with a gradual rise. You get to the top of Hereford St. and make a left and then its about 500 yards straight to the finish!

Some other tips:

  • I know the expo is lots of fun but I would not spend too much time on your feet there. Get your packet, make a quick trip around the expo and then get back to your hotel and get off your feet!
  • Make sure you are well hydrated before, during, and after the race!
  • Don’t worry about the weather! So many people psych themselves right out of a good race because they are so worried about the weather! Yes check the forecast so you can be dressed properly but there is nothing you can do about the weather so PLEASE don’t worry about it!
  • Last but not least, HAVE FUN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 I wish you all the best!

Dick Beardsley

 DICK BEARDSLEY

A very short bio about Dick Beardsley.  He is a “running legend,” but perhaps the most amazing thing about him is his climb back to health after becoming addicted to pain medication for more than four years.  (read more at http://www.marathonandbeyond.com/camp/beardsleyinfo.doc). 

dickb2
Dick Beardsley

Dick is best known for his incredible race in the 1982 Boston Marathon, which this year marks the 40th anniversary of this famous Boston Race which was dubbed the “Duel in the Sun” as he battled world record holder Alberto Salazar down to the finish line. Both broke the American record: Salazar won in a record time of 2:08:51, Beardsley’s time was 2:08:53! He was at the height of his professional running career.  Take a look at the famous race       

Then tragedy struck in November 1989. While using an auger to lift corn into a bin on his Minnesota farm, Dick became entangled in the machine; it began to literally tear him apart. Not expected to live or walk-much less ever run again-he managed to survive.  

What is Active Therapy?

by Tim Hines-
Elite Performance Chiropractic located in McKinney, Tx.

ART is a patented, soft-tissue mobilization technique preferred by many of today’s top athletes. The goal of ART is similar to sports massage, in that it aims to remove scar tissue from the muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Chronic and repetitive injury causes scar tissue to form in the body. Over time this scar tissue becomes adhesion that limits function and can became very painful — even leading to more injury.

Active Release is a very focused approach to aiding the body in recovering from the effects of these chronic injuries. Most often practiced by chiropractors, some have likened ART to a chiropractor’s approach to sports massage. While the end goals may be similar, the techniques are quite different. Swedish massage treats the body with a broad, full-body approach. Sports and therapeutic massage are more focused approaches, treating problem areas. ART is even more focused. Certified practitioners of ART are trained to find the source of the problem, go right to it and treat it directly.

How does it work? A simple way to describe it would be a pin-and-stretch. The ART practitioner finds the adhesion that is limiting the function of the muscle, joint, etc. Pressure is applied to the problem spot, and the muscle, or ligament, or tendon, is stretched while pressure is increased. The effect breaks up the adhesion and frees the surrounding soft-tissue. As a massage therapist who is certified in ART, I look at it as another tool in the tool-box of therapies.

Sometimes, all it takes is a screw-driver to fix something — other times, you might need a hammer — often, both a hammer, screw-driver, and even a wrench are needed. ART is great because it can treat injuries quickly, and creates a faster recovery. It can be a crucial part of your overall care. I find that combining ART with chiropractic adjustments and massage, along with proper conditioning and important things like the right fit of shoes, or a properly balanced bike, all work in conjunction to help you perform at a top level.

What’s the Hype about Sports Massages?

So, when you decide to go and get a massage to either prep for an upcoming race or recover from a long training event are you selective on who you go see, when you go and what to expect?   

Tim Hines 
Local Massage Therapist, Tim Hines, with Elite Performance Chiropractic located in McKinney, provides us with everything you would want to know about massages. 
 
Massage therapy has a world of benefits for bikers and runners.  Athletic performance, while healthy, also puts stress on the body — particularly when you push yourself to achieve that next goal.  Living takes its toll, and we must take care of our bodies or they will let us know about it.  We need food, sleep, and exercise to maintain ourselves.  Massage therapy, as well, plays an important part in helping the athlete continue to perform at a peak level.

 
Running and biking puts the muscles under stress.  This is good — it’s how the muscles grow and develop — but it also has a down-side.  The stress can create little injuries in the muscles, ligaments, and tendons, that if not attended to, leads to a build-up of scar tissue.  That scar tissue can form into web-like bundles we call adhesion.  This is that gristly stuff you sometimes feel when you are palpating a tender area, and the hard knots that ache in your shoulder tops and other places.  Adhesion limits the function of the muscle — decreasing performance and increasing the chance of new and greater injury.
 
Left unchecked it will cause imbalances in the body that start to spread problems from one part to the next — making you run or peddle harder with one leg than the other, for example.  That in turn may cause your hips to start twisting, creating instability in the low back.  The calves of runners can become extremely restricted — leading to problems like plantar-fasciitis or shin-splints.  Adhesion often forms in the upper back of bikers, because they spend so much time hunched over their handle bars.  From there, problems can spread to the neck and arms. Nerves can even became impinged, causing numbness and tingling in the hands.
 
Fortunately we’ve developed a solution over the years that we call massage therapy.  The goal of sports massage is to remove these adhesions — eliminating the painful restrictions and returning the body to proper and balanced function.  A good massage not only unties the knots in the muscles, but it also helps clean out the soft tissue, pushing away lactic acid and toxins and bringing in fresh blood flow, needed for muscle healing and recovery.
 
Athletes report that massage helps reduce the recovery phase their bodies go through, and enhances their build-up phase.  That simply means that the amount of time you feel sore and wiped-out following a performance is lessened.  And your muscles are able to adapt to new demands and grow stronger more effectively because they are free of restriction, and your body is in better balance.
The body does the best it can to deal with the stresses we it put under, but it can always use a helping hand.  Therapeutic massage, especially when combined with chiropractic care, is a natural and healthy way to take care of yourself, and get the most out of your athletic performance.
 
 
Tim is a Massage Therapist for Elite Performance Chiropractic in McKinney, Tx.  www.epcmckinney.com
Tim’s credentials include; LMT, Sports & Therapeutic Massage, ART Full Body Certified, Long Nerve Track Entrapment Certified, Lymphatic Drainage Therapy.  CK SPORTS and Elite Chiropractic partner together in various events.  Every Friday, Rich Miller, owner of Elite Performance offers his services at CK SPORTS from Noon to 1:30pm for local residents who would like a 15 minute analysis of any injury or ache they may have.  Call and schedule your 15 minute session now at 214-383-0088.

NUTRITION – HOW IMPORTANT IS IT AS PART OF YOUR TRAINING PLAN

Knowing about nutrition and what to eat is an extremely integral part of endurance sports.  What you eat can have a dramatic effect on your mood and running performance, so it is worthwhile to take some time and thought to what you put in your body when you want to perform well.  The most well planned and executed training plans can end quickly on race day if the athlete neglects any and all aspects of nutrition. That being said one can also get lost in the amount of information that is currently present in regards to what you should eat and how much.  Athletes can by overwhelmed with the amount of  information on television, magazines, race expos, training camps and the internet of so called healthy energy foods that over the years have become a multi-million dollar industry.

The simple truth is that the  foods that work best for most ahletes are the same ones our hunter-gatherer ancestors ingested: lean meats and fish from wild sources, vegetable protein sources, fresh fruits and vegetables that provide whole carbohydrates and natural unsaturated fats found in nuts, fish and vegetables. Not only are these foods not processed but they are mainly alkaline in nature thus help fight inflammation in the body.

Once you are able to improve your lifestyle diet you can start incorporating training specific or race specific nutritional products such as sports drinks, gels, bars and other powders that provide training/racing benefits. The number of products in the market in this category is too many to mention in this article but CK SPORTS supplies a majority of the industry leaders. The key is to experiment with these products during training so you know they agree with your system and when it is necessary to take them.

In general you should incorporate the following points to help improve your nutritional habits:

  • Eat lots of fruits and vegetables as they will provide you with most of your daily carbohydrates and they help keep body inflammation at a minimum.

  • Eat smaller meals more frequently which aids in proper digestion, doesn’t shock your insulin levels and stops you from over-eating.

  • Avoid saturated and trans fats as they increase inflammation in the body and are one of the causes of cardiovascular disease.

  • Eat lean protein as this will help you recover from harder workouts, promote lean muscle mass which burns the most calories and balances out blood sugar levels.

  • Avoid high-glycemic foods and drinks other than when your body needs them which is immediately before, during and after workouts.

  • Stay hydrated with water your main drink of choice.

  • Monosaturated fats such as olive oil, flax seed oil, canola oil and avocados are the healthiest fats to consume.

With all the information out there, if nutrition is a main concern for you, it is important to search out a qualified sports nutritionist who can help you make informed choices and limit those choices that are hampering your performance.

Some of the information in this article was provided by Dr. Jake Oergel; an accomplished Ironman triathlete who has competed in over 75 endurance events.