When a Negative becomes a Positive for Gina Jannereth

All State 13.1 Series – Half Marathon

Although the triathlon season has come to a wind down, many runners are ramping up for half and full marathons whether the races are local or in other cities and states.  Starting in October through mid February, it’s not hard to find a half or full marathon to run.  In this area alone, runners just finished up the 13.1 Series Half Marathon, the DRC Half Marathon, the Tyler Half and the new local half marathon in Fairview; the Showdown.

Now the well-known Dallas Half and Full Marathon(formerly White Rock)  is right around the corner and many local runners will be lined up at the start line on Sunday, December 9th.  So lets talk about the first time runner taking on their first race.  Most new runners either train with a running buddy or have joined a local program that enables them to train in a group setting.  Although they have done the mileage and have felt the burn, the fatigue and sometimes even a little mental burn out, come race day the adrenaline is in full force.  The excitement at the start line, the chatter among the runners, and the personal butterflies that have landed right in the middle of their stomach is a new experience.  Some runners handle it well while others find it a challenge.

Although the new runner is use to their normal training run they have done over and over again (meaning starting slowly and working into the pace of the day) something happens on a race day.  On race day the tendency for many new runners is to do the opposite and rather than starting out nice and easy they go out too fast.  The adrenaline takes over and urges the new runner to join the crowd that bolts from the starting line; always too fast.  And they know, they need to slow down but….they feel good, their legs are fresh, logic slips away….
Starting faster than what you are able to finish in is the least effective way to race and can be so mentally depleting. Starting out running, then watching your pace start to slow down, then having to walk, etc…..We have all been there.

So this article is to show an example of a new runner from CK SPORTS that had a plan, executed it and ignore all outside distractions.  She saw runners pass by her but she held her pace.  Her plan was to run her first half starting out at a 12 minute pace and increase her pace throughout the second half and that she did.  See results below.  The Mile 5 dip in the pace was also something she learned in her first race. ….wearing too much clothing had her shedding off clothes for the second half.  Next time, she will dress differently knowing her body temperature will warm up quickly.

Not many new runners complete their first distance race AND can show off a negative split race….Lets congratulate, Gina Jannereth!  One under her belt and her words, “It was a great race!  I was so excited that I followed my head and stayed disciplined.  I felt good during the race and after the race.”

Mile 1 11:53
Mile 2 12:15
Mile 3 11:49
Mile 4 12:02
Mile 5 13:10**
Mile 6 11:54
Mile 7 11:48
Mile 8 11:35
Mile 9 11:20
Mile 10 10:35
Mile 11 10:24
Mile 12 10:10
Mile 13 10:19

Should I Wear Sunglasses When Exercising?

Do you often wonder why you don’t see more athletes wearing sunglasses when they are training and/or racing outside in the sun?  Some feel that the glasses are cumbersome and get in their way.  Others just have problems finding the right sunglasses that don’t slip on their nose, don’t fog and are the right weight for them.  Well sunglasses are just about as important as good running shoes if training outside on a regular basis.

Depending on the time of day you are exercising, direct sunlight can cause unnecessary strain on your eyes.  Sunglasses are a form of protective eyewear which protects ones eyes from bright light and damaging ultraviolet radiation (UVR).  Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is part of the natural radiation found in the invisible light spectrum. There are 3 ranges of UV: UVA, UVB and UVC.  Prolonged exposure to UVA and UVB rays can even increase the possibility of significant eye damage, including temporary discomfort to long-term vision problems such as cataracts.
Runners, cyclists, swimmers and walkers that exercise outside on a regular basis can face visual problems due to prolong exposure to sunlight if they are not wearing some type of visual aid.  Health professionals recommend use of sunglasses not only for protection against bright light and UV rays but also to prevent drying of retina and protect eyes from the entry of foreign body.
When selecting your sunglasses you will have a wide variety of lens tint options to suit your preference and outdoor lighting condition. Smoke lenses show the least amount of color distortion and are perfect for use in full sun conditions. Brown lenses are great for bright sunlight and enhance color.

AC (All conditions) Red lenses offer an enhanced view in cloudy or foggy weather. Red lenses will also provide contrast in mid to low lighting conditions.  Yellow lenses offer an extremely bright view in overcast or rainy conditions.

Clear lenses enable the wearer to have protection at night, or other extremely low lighting conditions. Although clear, the Tifosi clear lenses will still offer 100% UVA/UVB protection.

CK SPORTS can help you find sunglasses that fit your face and that will meet your needs as a runner, walker or cyclist.   We carry the Tifosi brand ( the Italian word referring to a super-fan, an enthusiast) that have specific lens for your sport and provide you with various options as far as lens tint/color.   Their mission is to design eyewear for all sports and outdoor activities that include swimming, biking and running as well as golf, tennis and fishing to mention a few other sports.   These sunglasses (pictured in this article) are  lightweight and can fit all face sizes.

Stop in and try a pair on.  CK SPORTS is located at 121 and Custer in McKinney, Tx and we are opened seven days a week.

DISCO TRIATHLON ON FOR THIS SUNDAY!

DISCO TRIATHLON ON FOR THIS SUNDAY!

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So what is an endorphin?  How do you explain or describe it?  

Well, Wikipedia’s definition is:

Endorphins (“endogenous morphine”) are endogenousopioidpeptides that function as neurotransmitters.[1] They are produced by the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus in vertebrates during exercise,[2]excitement, pain, consumption of spicy food, love and orgasm,[3][4] and they resemble the opiates in their abilities to produce analgesia and a feeling of well-being

ummmm…..what???  They areendogenous opioid peptides?   Okay then.  Lets start with an easy statement about endorphins.  They are supposed to make a person feel good – that simple.   Some people say it’s in our heads while others have done research and say it is a chemical released in our body that makes us happy, content, settled.  The articles side all over the place – they are not real…

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Endorphins Make Me Feel Good…

So what is an endorphin?  How do you explain or describe it?  

Well, Wikipedia’s definition is:

I will have a bowl of endorphins please

Endorphins (“endogenous morphine”) are endogenous opioid peptides that function as neurotransmitters.[1] They are produced by the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus in vertebrates during exercise,[2] excitement, pain, consumption of spicy food, love and orgasm,[3][4] and they resemble the opiates in their abilities to produce analgesia and a feeling of well-being

ummmm…..what???  They are endogenous opioid peptides?   Okay then.  Lets start with an easy statement about endorphins.  They are supposed to make a person feel good – that simple.   Some people say it’s in our heads while others have done research and say it is a chemical released in our body that makes us happy, content, settled.  The articles side all over the place – they are not real, they are very real, research has proven, research has not “scientifically” proven…..so read on and you make your own decision.

For runner’s and/or endurance athletes they often are heard describing it as a “runner’s high”.  You know, that good feeling you get after a long run, a roll in the hay or a good laugh?  It’s not just because you’ve relieved exercise guilt, had a wham-bam orgasm or heard an absolute knee-slapper.  That elated feeling, which can last up to 12 hours for some people,also  has a scientific explanation.  It comes from a release of endorphins.   And it’s an “all natural” way of getting high.  Endorphins trigger a positive feeling in the body, similar to that of morphine.     This  feeling,  is often accompanied by a positive and energizing outlook on life.   

Endorphins act as analgesics, which means they diminish the perception of pain. They also act as sedatives. They are manufactured in your brain, spinal cord, and many other parts of your body and are released in response to brain chemicals called neurotransmitters referenced in the Wikipedia definition outlined in this article earlier.  The neuron receptors endorphins bind to are the same ones that bind some pain medicines.  However, unlike with morphine, the activation of these receptors by the body’s endorphins does not lead to addiction or dependence.

Dr. Joel Fuhrman, MD, family practitioner and author of  “Eat for Health” and “Eat to Live” notes that the science of endorphins-from-exercise is controversial, and that some medical professionals believe the positive feeling you get when you meet a physical challenge, rather than the exertion itself, is what stimulates the endorphin release. Several articles that were researched indicated that endorphins are indeed real and provide benefits to us that include:

Relief of pain
Enhanced immune system
Reduced stress levels
Postpone aging process
Modulated appetite
Lowers blood pressure
Influences calm or euphoric state of mind

 But whatever the cause and benefit, exercise has been proven to enhance the mood.  So lets not speculate any longer.  Get outside, find your sport and start feeling good……endorphin or no endorphin.  In Dr. Fuhrman also recommends prolonged activities such as cross-country skiing, swimming, tennis or a long cardio workout for the best effects. So try to catch an endorphin  see what cha think!  

References;

Endorphins 101: Your Guide to Natural Euphoria
Dr Joel Fuhrman; MD Family practitioner and author

How Do I Use a Foam Roller?

Tips for Using a Foam Roller

  • Always check with your doctor before using a foam roller for myofascial release

  • Perform foam roller sessions when your muscles are warm or after a workout.

  • Position the roller under the soft tissue area you want to release or loosen.

  • Gently roll your body weight back and forth across the roller while targeting the affected muscle.

  • Move slowly and work from the center of the body out toward your extremities.

  • If you find a particularly painful area (trigger point), hold that position until the area softens.

  • Focus on areas that are tight or have reduced range of motion.

  • Roll over each area a few times until you feel it relax. Expect some discomfort. It may feel very tender or bruised at first.

  • Stay on soft tissue and avoid rolling directly over bone or joints.

  • Keep your first few foam roller sessions short. About 15 minutes is all you need.

  • Rest a day between sessions when you start.

  • Drink plenty of water after a session, just as you would after a sports massage.

  • After a few weeks you can increase your session time and frequency if you choose.

  • Do not use a foam roller without your physician’s approval if you have any heart illness or chronic pain condition.

More About Techniques With the Foam Roller

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  • Find a tender spot on the area you are working and keep the roller on this spot. Wait for discomfort to diminish by 50-75%. This could take some time and be uncomfortable.

  • When this area is no longer sensitive then begin to see if there are other sensitive areas and repeat.

  • When this area is free of pain and can be rolled over, then continue rolling regularly to keep the area relaxed.

  • Use the roller as warm up prior to activity and also for warm down after exercise

  • There is some freedom for experimentation and “feel” when using the rollers. See what works best for you and manipulate the roller to the correct position.

Maintaining Your Foam Roller

Due to how foam rollers are manufactured, all foam products will have some surface imperfections. Imperfections such as surface bubbles, dimensional tolerance and differences in color are normal. These imperfections will not affect the performance of the foam roller and other foam products.

Normal use will cause indentations or pressure points. Pressure points may slowly re-cover, however, continuous pressure lasting several hours should be avoided. Do not store objects on top of foam items. Foam performs best if stored flat, away from sunlight and within temperature ranges between 75°F – 125°F.

 Cleaning:    

Use a mild soap and water mixture or Isopropyl Rubbing alcohol.  DO NOT use bleach solutions, oils or other chemicals as they can cause softening, discoloration and distortion of shape.

CK SPORTS carries all types of foam rollers; full, half size and even the new GRID.  Stop in and let us set you up with the best foam roller for your sport. 

Triathlon Transition Tips

Article written by Poseidon Triathlon Coach, Jim Brown 

Practice – Both mentally and physically. It’s much easier and quicker to shave a minute or even more off your overall time than to try to improve your swim, bike or run by the same amount.  You can improve your transition times by this much with just an hour or two of practicing. In contrast, it could take as a long as an entire season (or longer) to shave a minute off a 750m swim or a 5K run. Visualizing a quick, clean transition before the race and at the end of your swim and bike legs can help your performance.

Get in Gear Put your bike in the right gear for the course before you rack. You won’t want to be in a high gear if there’s a big hill ready to greet you immediately out of T2! Do your course recon first!

Make your transition spot a clutter free zone –For sprint and Olympic distance triathlons, you don’t need socks or a lot of other clutter. Eliminating unnecessary items will help you and others around you.

Bike shoes in the pedals – Put on your bike shoes while riding the course at 18 mi/hr instead of standing still in transition. (Unless T1 exits is on a big hill!) You can clip your shoes into place with rubber bands. There are lots of Youtube videos demonstrating this technique.

Run with your bike – After putting your helmet on, run upright with good form on the left side of your bike holding your seat with your right hand.

Flying Mount – Learn a flying mount & dismount. It’s good to practice on a trainer or a soft track surface first. There are lots of Youtube videos demonstrating this technique.

Your bike is your Sherpa—Tape Gels, and sunglasses (sometimes they’ll fit on the outside of your helmet), and whatever else you may need to your bike.  It’s a waste of time to rummage around the transition area looking for these items and packing them for the ride.

T1 and T2 are not fitting rooms – Any clothing changes, especially on a wet body takes lots of time. Triathlon suits are designed for swimming, biking and running, so you shouldn’t need to change clothes.

Location, Location, Location – Know where your bike is located, where the bike and run exits are, and the quickest route to them.  In huge transition areas, it’s sometimes a good idea to use a bright colored marker (I’ve seen balloons, teddy bears, old swim caps, chalk marks, etc.) to help you find your bike.

Stand up/Spin up/Stretch—The last few minutes on the bike should prepare you for the run. Stand up and pedal in a high gear first for a minute or two to shunt blood from your quadriceps to other muscles in your legs.  Stretch out your hamstrings and calf muscles, to get them ready to run.  Spin up in an easy gear at high cadence (90), which helps activate your neuromuscular system for running.

Use lace locks or speed laces (and body glide/baby powder)—Tying shoe laces takes time. Body glide or baby powder put in your shoe ahead of time can allow for quick foot entry into your shoe. It’s also faster to put on your shoes while standing as opposed to sitting down and getting up.   All of these race items can be found at CK SPORTS, located at 121 and Custer in McKinney.

Hit the road fastIn T2, grab what you need and go. Put on your hat, fuel, and race belt/bib while you are running.  Even if you are running slightly slower through transition, it’s better than standing still.


Never try anything new on race day!

ATTEND THE TRANSITION CLINIC AT CK SPORTS ON TUESDAY, MAY 15TH AT 6:30PM.  They are located at 8880 State Highway 121, McKinney, TX 75070